We double through two realities. A startling question is asked “which is the real reality”.


There are certain points to note before going into the review in full.


1. As a general rule, I don’t read reviews on a book I’m about to review.

At first, it never crossed my mind to do so. When it did occur to me, I thought I didn’t want any other voices shaping how I thought of a book before I would pen down my first thoughts. (See how I got in three thought’s in there. I may have got my groove back). But this is Ted Dekker. Ted Dekker. He leaves my head reeling sometimes. I had to glance at some reviews for my thoughts to come together on this one. Moreover, I read this book close to a year ago – my last novels before resuming at Law school – and I’m only just reviewing it.

2. In the course of reading a review, I noted a reviewer wrote that this book is fantasy! Wait, what? Oh that’s so true. I rarely ever set out for fantasy books. Ted Dekker and Frank Peretti’s books do pull me to that side though.
Sit tight to know why this is one fantasy book you would want to read, even if its not usually your genre.


Ever saw Hannah Montana? She sang “you get the best of both worlds”. Yes, that’s the play in these four books – Black, Red, White, Green.

Thomas Hunter awakens in a different reality after a gunshot wound to the head. His life is never stable after that, and neither is anyone’s globally. The world powers would come to depend on this guy for information – what is he exactly? A psychic?

He oscillates between two worlds as a hero of a sort. His actions( including possible death) in one world affect his actions in the other, and vice versa. But his help is needed as the world is running towards destruction. Which world, you may ask? Both.


The book is a four-in-one series. It starts with Black, then Red, White, and Green. Green can as well be book one. Someone said its book 0. The series has a cyclical projection with the last book merging into the first, resulting in no ending. It begins at the end, and ends at the beginning. (read “Circle Series”).

Its gripping. Full of rocky uncertainty and it keeps a reader locked in. Not necessarily the most artful wordsmith there is, Dekker is however gooood with his imagery and anticipation antiques.

Anticipation is built up by the happenings in both worlds though set apart by eons.

Book’s spiritual realities, especially the portrayal of sin is crazy. You’d be reading and you’d find out you know exactly what present reality the future description is pointing out. Launching into Elyon’s presence is made possible as it is a pool. Changing from Horde to Albino is made possible only through death when you drown(new birth in Christ) – in this drowning, blood-water pushes super violently against your lungs and everything you’ve ever been, you choke, gasp, do nothing to save yourself.

Sin is in the awful skin scabs, jaundiced eye and stink. But this sin is the norm, so the fresh-skinned are the outcasts, the albinos, hated and incomprehensible.

What else is efficient? The themes from Black running through into Green. In White alone, the themes race from the great deception, to the Antichrist, Mark of the best and Amargeddon and contrary to what you may think, there’s no bore.

Hidden spiritual battles in the past world (our time) are revealed in the future world as physical realities.


Raison Strain is the deadly virus terrorists are employing in the past world. How can Tom’s “best of both worlds” experiences stop the Raison Virus? Will the presidential seat of the United States give enough credibility for ruling the nation to someone who appears to know things from his sleep? No one knows what will happen globally in the face of the terrorists spreading the raison strain. No one knows what will befall the circle who seek Elyon. No one knows anything but that ruin is on speed-drive.


To have my bases covered, I’ve got those of you who’ve been waiting for it; yes, there’s love in this book. Male-female relationship love. Thank you. And it brims with radical meaning.


At the end of it all, what I’ve written is a book review cum recommendation. I’m still willing to discuss on Ted Dekker, and these series in particular with any willing takers.

I reccomend this book to persons interested in the Christian faith in some capacity (being an allegorical work which helps expand some scriptural revelation). If you’re a fantasy-thriller reader, go for this. Looking for some fast-paced read or a challenge? you’re welcome.

Indicate if you’re willing to read the book and I hope you enjoy it when you do. If you’ve read the book, do give your thoughts. You can share this link with your friends who read too. Till next week Saturday.

Love and Light,

Debby.

4 Comments

  1. favourfasanya February 26, 2020 at 7:54 pm

    Thanks for this, Debby. I snapped my fingers at the point where you used three thought(s) in a sentence. I like it! I would like to get the book, please. Thank you.

    Reply
    1. admin - Site Author February 26, 2020 at 10:42 pm

      I know right! Thank you.

      Reply
  2. Victor Anuoluwapo May 6, 2020 at 10:49 pm

    I’ve always had a thing for biblical allegories(CS Lewis, John Bunyan, JRR Tolkien etc) and I find it great when people appreciate the deeper meaning in these so called ‘fantasy’ works.
    Ted Dekker has done a brilliant job in ‘Infidel’, ‘Tea with Hezbollah’ and ‘A.D. 30’ and so I have no doubt that this would be an impactful read for me.
    It’s nice to have a title to look forward to reading this break. Thank you

    Reply
    1. admin - Site Author May 20, 2020 at 1:42 am

      I’m glad you have this title to look forward to. Interestingly, I have not read the titles you mentioned. It’s a mutually beneficial position.
      Yep, biblical allegories are just the thing! Thanks for reading and taking time out to comment, Victor.

      Reply

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